EU referendum

How to respond to the ridiculous arguments people are making in favour of leaving the EU*

* “Brexit” is horrible. I’m passionately against unnecessary portmanteaus and refuse to use it. Soz.

nologic

They say: “We need to control immigration!”

You say: You people may desperately try to argue this isn’t about asylum-seekers fleeing the Middle East, but we all know the truth. The reality is though that the so-called “migration crisis” really wouldn’t be affected by the UK leaving the EU. The reason Germany, Croatia and Austria are struggling with migration levels is because of the Schengen agreement, which allows free movement without the need for passports or visas within the EU.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Oct. 17, 2013) Distressed persons are transferred from the amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17) to Armed Forces of Malta offshore patrol vessel P52. San Antonio provided food, water, medical attention, and temporary shelter to the rescued. San Antonio rescued 128 men adrift in an inflatable raft after responding to a call by the Maltese Government. (U.S. Navy photo/Released) 131017-N-ZZ999-009 Join the conversation http://www.navy.mil/viewGallery.asp http://www.facebook.com/USNavy http://www.twitter.com/USNavy http://navylive.dodlive.mil http://pinterest.com https://plus.google.com

The UK is not a part of Schengen, so we can refuse entry to migrants and asylum-seekers as it is – and this privilege would not be increased by leaving the EU. In fact, we would be more vulnerable: the Dublin convention of 2003 dictates that if a country in the EU processes an asylum application, they are responsible for the individual, and if they end up in a different country they can be sent back to their original point of entry. This means that if migrants try to cross the Calais border into the UK, French officials have to try and stop them. Were we to leave the EU, this would no longer be the case – we wouldn’t be able to count on the cooperation of the French authorities and we would lose the right to send migrants back.

They counter: “What about Turkey? If they join we’re screwed. I’m sure they want to work, but there are only so many jobs to go around!”

You respond: Nope. Actually that’s the exact opposite of how the economy works. More citizens create more demand for goods and services and hence, more jobs. It’s literally impossible for “them to come here and take our jobs”. And anyway, the UK has a veto which means Turkey will NOT join if we don’t want them to. Not to mention that making the drastic changes to even bother re-applying would take Turkey decades. (more…)

Stop mocking Jeremy Corbyn’s attempts at social media, at least he’s trying to engage a younger audience

jeremy corbyn at rallyThis weekend, breaking news in certain corners of the internet has been Jeremy Corbyn’s recent foray into the worlds of Snapchat and Instagram, and how it’s a social media car crash to rival a Kanye meltdown.

The faux pas have by any measure been fairly cringeworthy: his Instagram handle is jeremy_corbynmp, making his surname sound like it should rhyme with gore-gimp, and half of his snaps are in landscape format shot by a weirdly omnipresent third party who captioned a charming upload ‘selfie queue’ despite a distinct lack of selfies (clue’s in the name: it’s when you take a picture of yourself, not just anything involving a camera) and queues.

corbynselfie

Jeremy Corbyn is the first major political figure in the UK to sign up to Snapchat, the messaging service with 100 million daily active users of which almost half are under 25. It’s easy to stick to the snarky judgements, but it’s a lot more important to realise what this means. (more…)